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Linked Course Learning Communities


Linked Course Learning Communities

Capitalizing on faculty expertise, Linked Course Learning Communities have no residential requirement - students can live on or off-campus - and provide first-year students opportunities for deep exploration of an exciting and important topic through linked courses. 

Being part of a Linked Course Learning Community means that students will:

  • Enroll in 2 linked courses
  • Fulfill KU Core Goal requirements

The full list of Fall 2019 courses will be updated soon. Please check back for more infromation. 

Below are examples of past Linked Course Learning Communities: 

Building a Better Future World: Poverty

Poverty, inequality, and a consideration of whose voices are being included in policy decisions affecting our society are just a few of the issues that confront us today. Is equity for all possible or is it a figment of our imagination? In Building a Better Future World: Poverty, students will be introduced to the principles, theories, and methodology of psychology, while exploring how their study of poverty as a factor in their own lives move us towards building a better future world. Students will explore strategies and solutions, and wrestle with the question, can we really make a difference?

PSYC 104 - General Psychology
Instructor Robyn Kelton

Fulfills Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 credit hours

This course provides students with a basic introduction to the science of psychology and helps them develop a foundation of knowledge that builds across fundamental areas of study. Upon completing PSYC 104, students will be able to demonstrate basic competence in the principles, theories, and analytic methods used in social sciences.  In taking this course, students should expect to be able: to develop a fundamental understanding of the science of psychology, the study of thought, feelings, and behavior; to construct a working vocabulary of terminology used in psychology and a familiarity with key people and ideas that have shaped psychology; to practice systematic and technical writing skills as utilized in the psychological sciences; to think critically about the importance of scientific methods and ethical principles of research design, and how these contribute to the body of knowledge about psychology; to understand the connections between content areas within psychology, and how to apply those psychological principles to daily life and new situations; and to create a foundation of psychology knowledge as a prerequisite for all other psychology courses at KU.

Robyn Kelton is a 4th year PhD student in the Cognitive and Brain Sciences program at the University of Kansas. Robyn is a return Jayhawk who graduated with a BA in Psychology from KU in 2005. Before returning to KU, she spent several years conducting research and training in the field of early childhood education. Her main areas of research include child development, memory development, negative autobiographical memory, and how the way we recall our memories for stressful or traumatic events influences our wellbeing.   


SW 177 - Poverty & Inequality in the U.S.: Causes, Consequences, & Solutions
Alice Lieberman, Social Welfare

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 credit hours

The problem of poverty and inequality is “hot” again. Stories about job creation, the “Occupy” movement, the vanishing working class, the Brownback “blueprint” and the debates from left to right about how best to grow the economy all speak to the importance of poverty as a factor in our own lives, regardless of which side of the economic divide we live on. This course will use a variety of field and classroom tools to come to a deeper understanding of the problem, and our potential obligations as citizens to address it.

We will begin with definitions and historical underpinnings, and then move to an exploration of our topic through social, political, economic, and anthropological lenses. Although not central to the course, but critical to a full understanding of the subject, global poverty and its antecedents will also be covered. Major themes will include the measurement of poverty (from the perspective of both “insiders” and “outsiders”), its demographics, why inequality is a serious problem for the rich as well as the poor, and the effectiveness of various solutions attempted throughout history (from “the War on Poverty” to “Reaganomics,” state vs. federal programs vs. private, non-profit entities as service/benefit deliverers).

Professor Alice LiebermanAlice Lieberman is the Chancellor’s Club Professor of Teaching and Chair of the Bachelor of Social Work Program in the School of Social Welfare. She has written and researched extensively in the broad field of child welfare, with particular attention to children in the foster care system. Poverty is a primary correlate of child abuse and neglect; thus her interest in poverty in families is driven by a desire to know more about its impact on children and succeeding generations, and to contribute to the development of solutions for its amelioration.

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Building a Better Future World: Education

Education is a pillar of our society and plays an important role in working towards building a better future world. In Building a Better Future World: Education, students will be introduced to the profession of education and characteristics of effective teaching. Students will have the opportunity to observe teachers in public school classrooms and work with pupils during this course. Students will explore the question, can we really make a difference?

C&T 100 – Introduction to Education Profession
Education
Amy Quirin - Bio coming soon

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 credit hours

This course is designed to acquaint students with the profession of education by helping to increase an awareness of the role and characteristics of an effective teacher. Large and small group activities and assignments are dispersed throughout the semester to facilitate these outcomes. Students will be involved in observation of and participation with teachers and pupils in public school classrooms, which complement course activities and assignments. Students will work with a mentor pre-service teacher from the KU School of Education to provide discussions about each of the course objectives. C&T 100 is a pre-professional course. Successful completion of the course does not guarantee eventual admission to the School of Education's Teacher Education Program.

 


 

UNIV 101 – University Seminar
Michele Casavant, Education Administration

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for C&T 100 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Education learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.

Michele CasavantMichele Casavant is the Director of Advising in the School of Education and the Director of the Multicultural Scholars Program.

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Communicating Science: Climate & Extinction

What is global warming? What relationship do we have with the world around us? What kind of relationship do we want to have? In Communicating Science: Climate & Extinction, students will develop a strong foundation for success at KU and beyond, while learning how to critically evaluate and effectively discuss the pressing issues that should be of concern to all of us as global citizens.

GEOL 121 - Life Through Time: DNA to Dinosaurs
Leigh Stearns, Geology

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), Goal 3 Natural Sciences (GE3N), 3 credit hours

Welcome to “Life Through Time: DNA to Dinosaurs!” Have you ever watched the news and asked yourself why it matters if global temperatures are warming, or whether humans are responsible for the extinction of species around the globe? Have you ever wandered through a museum and wondered what life in Kansas would have been like 100 million years ago, or how dinosaurs could grow to be longer than 4 KU buses and weigh as much as 5 elephants? “Life Through Time: DNA to Dinosaurs” will lead you on a journey through time to explore the eternal interconnections between life and the geology of Earth, including our own complex relationships with the world around us.  

Leigh Stearns studies outlet glacier dynamics in both Greenland and Antarctica, using satellite remote sensing techniques, field based observations, and numerical modeling. Her research addresses questions of short- and long-term ice sheet dynamics by utilizing innovative geophysical technology, developing new remote sensing products, and building numerical ice-flow models.

 

 

 


UNIV 101 – University Seminar
Jill Becker, KU Libraries

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to exploring the interconnections between life and the geology of earth, by being a part of the Communicating Science: Climate & Extinction learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.

Jill Becker portraitJill Becker is the Head of the Center for Undergraduate Initiatives and Engagement for KU Libraries.  A Kansas native, Jill grew up in Eudora (about 10 miles east of KU), earned her bachelor’s degree in English from KU, and her master’s degree in Library Science from Emporia State University. At present, Jill is pursuing a doctoral degree in Higher Education Administration at KU.  Although she likes to joke that she didn’t get very far in life geographically, her hopes as a librarian and teacher illustrate her high ambition: to help undergraduate students gain a better understanding of the nature of information in today’s world so that they can become informed seekers, users, and producers of information. When not engaged in cultivating students’ intellectual capacities, Jill works on cultivating her secret persona as an amateur urban farmer by trying (and failing) to grow vegetables in her yard and tending to her chickens.

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Communicating Science: The Natural World

Cells, communities, and ecosystems! Oh, my! In Communicating Science: Natural World, students will develop a strong foundation for success at KU and beyond, while learning how to sort out valid scientific information from all the information available and use that information to inform decisions, a skill important to all of us as global citizens.

BIOL 100 – Principles of Biology  
Gerry de Boer, Biology

Fulfills Goal 3, Natural Science, Biological Sciences of the KU Core, 3 credit hours

Intended for non-science majors, in this course students learn the basic concepts of biology at the cellular, organismal and population levels of organization and their applications to humans and modern society. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 102 is recommended.

Gerrit deBoer earned his doctorate from the University of Maryland and is an Associate Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. His research interests center on the physiological basis of insect-plant interactions.  More specifically, his research focuses on the chemical and chemoperceptual mechanisms underlying feeding decisions by caterpillars. Many herbivorous insects feed on only a few plant species despite an overwhelming abundance of plants in their environment. Caterpillars are excellent models for studying the physiological basis of feeding behavior because of their keen sense of smell and taste and their relatively simple nervous system which is readily accessible for experimental manipulation.


UNIV 101 – University Seminar
Kim Criner, Center for Sustainability

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for BIOL 100 students, by being a part of the Communicating Science: The Natural World learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


Kim Criner earned a B.A. in English from James Madison University, with a minor in Dance. After working in the book publishing industry and non-profit arena for a number of years, Kim realized a strong interest in waste management and local food systems. She went on to receive a M.S. in Environmental Studies from Ohio University, with a focus on sustainability education in higher ed. She has worked in the Office of Sustainability at Ohio U., the Center for Sustainability at Johnson County Community College, and is now proud to be a Jayhawk! Kim also serves as the education appointee to the Douglas County Food Policy Council. 

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Global Perspectives: Gender, Africa & the African Diaspora

A “global perspective” is when someone can think about a situation as it relates to the rest of the world. In Global Perspectives: Gender, Africa, & the African Diaspora, students will be introduced to the principles, theories, and methodology of psychology, while exploring the concept of “feminism” and “gender identity” in relation to Anglophone (English speaking) and Francophone (French-speaking) West African and Caribbean cultures. 

PSYC. 104 - General Psychology
Robyn Kelton, Psychology

Fulfills Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 credit hours

This course provides students with a basic introduction to the science of psychology and helps them develop a foundation of knowledge that builds across fundamental areas of study. Upon completing PSYC 104, students will be able to demonstrate basic competence in the principles, theories, and analytic methods used in social sciences.  In taking this course, students should expect to be able: to develop a fundamental understanding of the science of psychology, the study of thought, feelings, and behavior; to construct a working vocabulary of terminology used in psychology and a familiarity with key people and ideas that have shaped psychology; to practice systematic and technical writing skills as utilized in the psychological sciences; to think critically about the importance of scientific methods and ethical principles of research design, and how these contribute to the body of knowledge about psychology; to understand the connections between content areas within psychology, and how to apply those psychological principles to daily life and new situations; and to create a foundation of psychology knowledge as a prerequisite for all other psychology courses at KU.

Robyn Kelton is a 4th year PhD student in the Cognitive and Brain Sciences program at the University of Kansas. Robyn is a return Jayhawk who graduated with a BA in Psychology from KU in 2005. Before returning to KU, she spent several years conducting research and training in the field of early childhood education. Her main areas of research include child development, memory development, negative autobiographical memory, and how the way we recall our memories for stressful or traumatic events influences our wellbeing.   


AAAS 177 - Women with Open Eyes: Feminism, Gender, Culture & Identity in Africa and the African Diaspora
Marwa Ghazali, African & African American Studies

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 credit hours

What does “being a woman” mean? Do you think ‘being a woman’ is perceived the same way across different cultures? How much of gender identity is universal and how much is it tied to socialization and cultural norms? To patriarchy? To education? To the economy? To religion? What does the term “gender” mean? Is it the same as feminism? What is feminism? What is womanism? In Feminism is for Everybody: Passionate Politics, author bell hooks describes feminism as “a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression.” This course will introduce students to the concept of feminism and gender identity in Francophone (French-speaking) West African and Caribbean cultures. Among the various questions that this seminar will address are: How is feminism and gender identity connected to themes such as patriarchy, sexism, violence and stereotypes? How are gender expectations and stereotypes formed and how do they impact development and human rights?  What role does class and education play in empowering women? Through readings and films such as  Krik? Krak! by Edwidge Danticat, So Long a Letter by Mariama Bâ and Faat Kiné by Sembène Ousmane we will explore these various questions.

Marwa Ghazali biography coming soon.

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Global Perspectives: WWI

A “global perspective” is when someone can think about a situation as it relates to the rest of the world. In Global Perspectives: WWI, students will be introduced to the interdisciplinary study of women, gender, and sexuality, while exploring how World War I continues to shape our lives up to the present day.

WGSS 101 - Introduction to Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies
Nicholas Syrett, Women,Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Fulfills Goal 4 Outcome 1 (AE41), Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 credit hours

WGSS 101 introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of women, gender, and sexuality. Specifically, students will learn how gender and sexuality are constructed in society and culture through institutions such as schools, family, and media. We will ask how we learn about gender and why it mattes, how intersecting gender with other categories of identity such as race, class, sexuality, age, ability, and nationality helps us understand the complexity of gender, hierarchy, gender inequality, and gender oppression. We will see how individuals and communities have resisted and mobilized against various forms of gender discrimination. We will explore these questions while reading a variety of materials that explore the roles and representations of women, gender, and sexuality in media, art, politics, economy, and education.


Nick Syrett grew up in Peterborough, Ontario, a university town northeast of Toronto. He went to college in New York City, where he majored in Women's and Gender Studies, and then earned a Ph.D. in American Studies. Syrett researches the history of gender, sexuality, and childhood in nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States and teaches in sexual politics in the contemporary world. 

 

 

 


HUM/EURS 177 - How World War I Changed the World
Dale Urie, HUM

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 credit hours

World War I, which began 100 years ago, is largely responsible for shaping the way we understand ourselves and creating the world we inhabit. The Great War accelerated changes in technology, transportation, art, fashion, food, science, religion, gender and social relations, leisure, and other aspects of everyday life in Europe and the United States. From Downtown Abbey (PBS) to War Horse (Spielberg), even today, we find it necessary to make sense of this catastrophic event in modern history. This course will try to do just that.

Senior Lecturer Dale UrieDale Urie grew up in Florida, part of a family that took vacations to Egypt, Jordan, Israel and many parts of Europe. A family vacation as a teenager launched her interest in understanding the connections between the past and present, between peoples of one region and another and between religions. As a modern European historian she has taught classes on the development of civilizations and on both World War I and World War II. Most recently she won a Fulbright to continue examining the role that Muslim immigrants in Europe are playing in redefining what it meant to be European and what it means to be Muslim in traditionally non-Muslim countries. She is currently in Florence, Italy with a group of KU students directing a semester-long study abroad program for the Humanities and Western Civilization program. The semester ends in Paris, France where she hopes to do some research that will be included in this course on World War I.

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Identity and Experience: Cultural Diversity

Identity & Experience: Cultural Diversity is a Learning Community focusing on the varieties of human experience. 

Anthropology 160 - Varieties of Human Experience 

Bart Dean, Anthropology

Fulfills Goal 4 Outcome 2 (AE42), Goal 3 Arts and Humanities (GE3H), Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S)

An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning.

Bartholomew Dean (Oxford MPhil, Harvard PhD) is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at The University of Kansas and a research associate of KU's Laboratory of Biological Anthropology. In addition, he is a research affiliate at the Universidad Nacional de San Martín (Tarapoto, Peru), where he directs the Anthropology Section of the Regional Museum, Dean is a Contributing Editor for Lowland South America, U.S. Library of Congress’ Handbook of Latin American Studies. His research interests include the ethnology of the Peruvian Amazon, health, human rights, political anthropology, social theory and ethics. His publications include Urarina Society, Cosmology and History in the Peruvian Amazonia (2009, 2013), as well as a co-edited book, numerous articles and several textbooks. Dean is currently working on a monograph dedicated to understanding social trauma associated with the political violence and civil unrest in the bajo (lower) Huallaga Region of Peruvian Amazonia. Dean is active in the area of human rights advocacy.



UNIV 101 – University Seminar

Kate Nygren, First-Year Experience

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to exploring KU as a culture as part of the Identity & Experience: Cultural Diversity learning community, you will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.

Kate Nygren is the Assistant Director for Academic Programs in the Office of First-Year Experience where she oversees UNIV 101. She originally joined KU in 2013 as a student and instructor in the English department studying contemporary theater. She loves to read and see plays that explore cultural diversity in the United States and beyond. Any time she travels, she can be found at a local theater taking in something new. 

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Identity and Experience: Social Connections and Communities

Identity & Experience: Social Connections and Communities is a Learning Community focusing on a variety of human organizations and social institutions.

SOC 104 - Elements of Sociology
Lisa-Marie Wright, Sociology

Fulfills Goal 4 Outcome 1 (AE41), Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S)

The study of social life, including how human groups are organized, how they change, and how they influence individuals. Consideration is given to a variety of human organizations and social institutions and how these groups and institutions both determine, and are determined by, human beings.


Lisa-Marie Wright - bio coming soon.

 

 

 

 

 


UNIV 101 – University Seminar
Katie Bottorff, Undergraduate Advising Center

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to making connections as part of the Identity & Experience: Social Connections and Communities learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.

Katie Bottorff is an academic advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Center. She is a native Iowan and received a B.A. in Elementary Education from the University of Iowa, then relocated to Kansas to earn a master's degree in Higher Education Administration here at KU. Because teaching was her first love, she quickly found a way to incorporate it into her day-to-day job. As a college student, Katie was an active member of the campus communitiy. Outside of the classroom, she was involved in various student organizations focusing on recruitment and welcoming new students to the university, as well as the U of I's Dance Marathon organization. When she is not in her office or somewhere around campus, you can generally find her in the record store (Love Garden), reading a good book, hanging out with her cat, Lu, or listening to some rad tunes. 

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