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Linked Course Learning Communities


Linked Course Learning Communities

Capitalizing on faculty expertise, Linked Course Learning Communities have no residential requirement - students can live on or off-campus - and provide first-year students opportunities for deep exploration of an exciting and important topic through linked courses. 

Being part of a Linked Course Learning Community means that students will:

  • Enroll in 2 linked courses
  • Fulfill KU Core Goal requirements

The full list of Fall 2019 courses are seen below. We will continue to update these as we receive more information.

Building a Better Future World: Communication and Leadership

Communications Studies (COMS) 130- Speaker-Audience Communication

Goal 2 Outcome 2 (GE22), 3 credit hours:

Study of rhetorical theory and its application to the preparation, presentation, and criticism of oral discourse in audience situations. Special consideration of listening behavior and of the ethical conduct of speech in a free society. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement.

Civil and effective discourse is essential to personal development and success, as well as to social and political progress. What are the ethics of listening and speech making?  How do these skills contribute to a free society? In Building a Better Future World: Communication and Leadership students will investigate these questions and practice these skills in Communication Studies 130. The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of communication studies, while also introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Communication Studies 130, but in all of their courses. 


Meggie Mapes, Course Director

Meggie Mapes (Ph.D. Southern Illinois University, Carbondale) is the Introductory Course Director in the Department of Communication Studies. As a teacher, Meggie values critical thinking and facilitating student advocacy skills. As a researcher, she studies communication through pedagogy, feminist theory, and rhetoric. Meggie lives in the Kansas City Waldo neighborhood with her partner and 2 dogs where she enjoys the local community vibe. When she isn’t writing or working, she weightlifts (#profswholift) and serves on the Kansas City’s Environmental Management Commission.


UNIV 101- University Seminar

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for Coms. 130 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Communication and Leadership learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


Jill Becker, KU Libraries

A Photo of Jill Becker from KU LibrariesJill Becker is the Head of the Center for Undergraduate Initiatives and Engagement for KU Libraries.  A Kansas native, Jill grew up in Eudora (about 10 miles east of KU), earned her bachelor’s degree in English from KU, and her master’s degree in Library Science from Emporia State University. At present, Jill is pursuing a doctoral degree in Higher Education Administration at KU.  Although she likes to joke that she didn’t get very far in life geographically, her hopes as a librarian and teacher illustrate her high ambition: to help undergraduate students gain a better understanding of the nature of information in today’s world so that they can become informed seekers, users, and producers of information. When not engaged in cultivating students’ intellectual capacities, Jill works on cultivating her secret persona as an amateur urban farmer by trying (and failing) to grow vegetables in her yard and tending to her chickens.


Josh Bolick, KU Libraries

A Photo of Josh Bolick with a galactic backgroundJosh Bolick is a Scholarly Communication Librarian in KU Libraries’ Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright. After serving in the U.S. Navy, Josh earned a bachelor’s degree in History and Philosophy at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, and his master’s in Library and Information Studies from Florida State University. Josh’s work focuses on advancing principles of openness, authors’ rights, and open education, and he publishes and presents regularly on these topics. He is deeply passionate about and committed to this work, but still makes time for cycling, running, punk/metal, and grilling. He’d love to eat tacos with you sometime.

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Building a Better Future World: Education and Teaching

Curriculum & Teaching (C&T) 100 – Introduction to Education Profession

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 credit hours:

This course is designed to acquaint students with the profession of education by helping to increase an awareness of the role and characteristics of an effective teacher. Large and small group activities and assignments are dispersed throughout the semester to facilitate these outcomes. Students will be involved in observation of and participation with teachers and pupils in public school classrooms, which complement course activities and assignments. Students will work with a mentor pre-service teacher from the KU School of Education to provide discussions about each of the course objectives. C&T 100 is a pre-professional course. Successful completion of the course does not guarantee eventual admission to the School of Education's Teacher Education Program.

Education is a pillar of our society and plays an important role in helping young people become engaged citizens. In Building a Better Future World: Education and Teaching, students will be introduced to the profession of education and characteristics of effective teaching in Curriculum and Teaching 100. Students will have the opportunity to observe teachers in public school classrooms and work with pupils during the semester. The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of education and teaching, while also introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Curriculum & Teaching 100, but in all of their courses. 


Instructor TBD.


UNIV 101 – University Seminar

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for C&T 100 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Education learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


Michele Casavant, Education Administration

Michele CasavantMichele Casavant is originally from a small college town in Washington State. She wrote her doctoral dissertation on Star Trek and she continues to be a fan of the show. She earned her Ph.D. in American Studies at the University of Kansas in 2003 and is currently the Director of Undergraduate Advising for the School of Education. Her research interests began as a focus on representations of underrepresented identities in science fiction, which she continues to explore and teach. Her interests now also include how current educational systems enhance certain inequalities in the U.S. and the ways in which the same systems have the power to undo these disparities.

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Building a Better Future World: Politics and Public Service

Political Science (POLS) 110-Introduction to U.S. Politics

Fulfills Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 credit hours: 

An introduction to basic American governmental institutions, political processes, and policy.

Understanding the basic workings of American governmental institutions, political processes, and policy is essential for effective citizenship.The Building a Better Future World: Politics and Public Service learning community will provide students with the tools and knowledge to understand and critically engage with American politics and political systems in Political Science 110. The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of politics and public service, while introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Political Science 110, but in all of their courses. 


Kevin Mullinix

A Photo of Kevin Mullinix

Kevin Mullinix is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science. His research concentrates on political behavior and public policy. Professor Mullinix examines the extent to which political parties and elected officials shape the public’s attitudes toward various policies. More recently, his research has focused on the effects of wrongful convictions for attitudes toward the death penalty and the effects of racial disparities in the justice system for trust in police. ​He has a related research agenda on the generalizability of experiments in the social sciences. Professor Mullinix has published his research in Political Behavior, Political Communication, International Journal of Public Opinion Research, Political Research Quarterly, Journal of Experimental Political Science, Presidential Studies Quarterly, PS: Political Science & Politics, and the Policy Studies Journal. 


UNIV 101-University Seminar

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for Pols. 110 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Politics and Public Service learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


Jamie Wilson

Jamie WilsonJamie Wilson is an academic advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Center. She is a native Texan who received her Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (Middle School Education) from Texas A&M University. Jamie also holds a Master of Science in Higher Education Student Affairs from Baylor University and a Master of Arts in English Language and Literature from Fayetteville State University. Prior to coming to KU, Jamie taught at the middle school, high school, and community college levels; therefore, having the opportunity to add teaching to her job at KU was very exciting! One of Jamie’s favorite things to do is travel, and she has been fortunate to have these opportunities due to having a partner that is active duty military. She is also an avid reader and can often be found perusing the shelves of The Raven or The Dusty Bookshelf bookstores in downtown Lawrence.


Annie Bigby is an academic advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Center. Before working for the University of Kansas, she completed her Bachelor of Science in Education in Elementary Education at KU and taught fifth graders in Kansas City, Kansas. When Annie’s not focused on advising, she likes to focus on engaging in the world around her, whether that be spending quality time with friends and family or traveling to someplace new. Annie believes experiences shape you and play a crucial role in developing compassionate, well-rounded people who embrace diversity in all its forms. As an advisor and instructor, she hopes to support you on your journey of discovery so that you leave the University prepared both academically and socially for what your future holds.

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Building a Better Future World: Sustainability and Society

History (HIST) 177-First Year Seminar 

Goal 1 Learning Outcome 1 (GEII), 3 credits:

How does the introduction of new machines affect the way we understand ourselves, as well as our conceptions of space and time? Additionally, how can the historical study of this process of adaptation help us understand our current relationship with technology? This course will investigate humans’ relationship with technology over the past two centuries, paying particular attention to the ways that machines such as locomotives, artificial lighting, telephones, telegraphs, watches, bicycles, automobiles, and airplanes have been constrained by historical precedent while challenging and altering our attitudes toward spatiality and temporality. By studying these and other examples from the past, students will develop and practice skills that will help them in future college course

Overpopulation, climate change, and water shortages are just a few of the global challenges that confront us. Is a sustainable future possible or is it a figment of our imagination? In the courses that comprise Building a Better Future World: Sustainability & Society, History 177 and Urban Planning 200, students will investigate how urban planning and our historic and present relationship with technology can offer ideas for building a better future world. Students will explore strategies and solutions, and wrestle with the question; can we really make a difference?


Nathan Wood 

A Photo of Nathan Wood, a faculty member

Nathan Wood was born in the West, grew up in the South, and did his graduate work in the Midwest, at Indiana University. He has also spent a tenth of his life in Poland, where he lived in the early nineties, 2001, and most recently, as a Fulbright scholar from August to December, 2012. His major research interests include modernity, identity, cities, and technology in East Central Europe from the 1880s to 1939. His current research on bicycles, automobiles, and airplanes in Poland before WWII intersects well with his passion for cycling and learning about fast machines he’ll never be able to afford. As befitting his last name, he also really likes trees.

 


Urban Planning (UBPL) 200- Sustainability and Society 

Goal 5 Outcome 1 (AE51), Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 credits:

This course will introduce the concept of sustainability, examining its early iterations, recent applications, and possible future transformations. Critical analysis of sustainability as a concept and societal goal will be a course cornerstone. We will examine two contemporary social issues that are relevant to students at the University of Kansas. Social science perspectives will be emphasized, but, because sustainability necessitates an interdisciplinary perspective, the course will consider the contributions of a wide range of disciplines to these issues.


A Photo of Stacey White outside, faculty member

Stacey White 

Stacey Swearingen White has lived in six states and even more cities, but Lawrence, Kansas, has been home for longer than anywhere else. Her interest in sustainability informs both her teaching and research. She is one of the co-founders of KU’s Center for Sustainability, and has published several articles focused on campus sustainability. For 2017-2019, she served as a Faculty Fellow in the KU Office of Student Affairs, where she conducted research on food insecurity among students. She loves birdwatching and traveling to new places, and is especially happy when those two things coincide.

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Identity and Experience: Cultural Diversity

Anthropology (ANTH) 160-Varieties of Human Experience

Fulfills Goal 4 Outcome 2 (AE42), Goal 3 Arts and Humanities (GE3H), Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 Credit Hours:

An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning.

In Identity and Experience: Cultural Diversity students will explore different ways of knowing and navigating daily life through activities connecting them to museum collections, research centers, and campus and community organizations. Students will develop greater appreciation of how diversity enhances learning and identify ways to join the KU community. The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of anthropology, while also introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Anthropology 160, but in all of their courses.  


Brent Metz

A Photo of Brent MetzWithin days of the approval of his doctoral dissertation in 1995, Brent Metz began his first contracted full-time lectureship. For the next six years, Metz earned two full-time, one-year positions at Western Michigan and Central Connecticut State, a two-year position at Grinnell College, and a renewable non-tenure position at Temple University. He turned down tenure-track positions at Seton Hall and Monmouth because they were incompatible with his personal life at the time. In 2000, he moved to Lawrence, Kansas and began a position as Associate Director of the Center of Latin American Studies in 2001, a position he held until 2005, when Metz transitioned to a tenure-track appointment in KU Anthropology. He received tenure in 2011.

 


UNIV 101-University Seminar

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for Anth. 160 students, by being a part of the Identity and Experience: Cultural Diversity learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences. 


Hannah Goetz

Hannah Goetz image

Hannah Goetz {She/Her/Hers} is the Communications Coordinator for the Undergraduate Advising Center and also advises students in this role. She is an Arkansas native and has a B.S. in Business Administration with focus on Marketing as well as a Master’s degree in College Student Personnel. Throughout graduate school Hannah worked in Campus Life supporting student leadership, involvement, and Campus Recreation. In Fall 2014 Hannah relocated to Lawrence to work at the University of Kansas! Summer Orientation is her favorite time of year on campus.

From the age of 6 Hannah has been attending live music such as the Beale Street Music Festival in Memphis, TN.  She loves being around large, diverse groups of people – working at KU has enabled her to continue to surround herself with different ideas and learning opportunities. Outside the classroom, you can find Hannah spending time outside in her hammock, listening to records and attending concerts, or lounging with her cat Rhonda. She is also always up for a good quote or book recommendation!

 


Alex Cruse, First-Year Experience

Alex Cruse is an Assistant Director for Orientation Programs in the Office of First-Year Experience. Overseeing our phenomenal team of Orientation Assistants, Alex is present for their hiring, training, and supervision as they welcome new Jayhawks to the University of Kansas. In addition to her work with our Orientation Assistants, Alex also assists with different facets of orientation programming as well as coordination of Hawk Week events.

A Photo of Alex Cruse

Prior to joining the Office of First-Year Experience, Alex worked as an academic advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Center here at KU.  Alex received her Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Iowa with a minor in English. She is currently working on her Masters in Higher Education Administration. In her spare time, Alex likes to go to concerts and take pictures of her cat, Bear.

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Identity and Experience: Film and New Media

FMS 100-Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 Credit Hours:

An introduction to analyzing and thinking critically about film and other media. Students will learn to read and interpret the basic signs, syntaxes, and structures of cinematic language. Through direct analysis of selected films, television, and new media, students will evaluate and construct evidentiary arguments about the aesthetic strategies creators use to make meaning for audiences. In addition, this course will familiarize students with the historical and industrial dimensions of film and media, as well as the influence technology has on their development into the twenty-first century.

Films, television, and new media frame, inform, and lend context to myriad aspects of modern life. Understanding, interpreting, and analyzing media within historical and technological contexts allows students the opportunity to better understand their world. The Identity and Experience: Film and New Media learning community will help students apply this learning to their transitions to KU. The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of new media, while introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Film and Media Studies 100, but in all of their courses.  


Carl Swanson, Film and Media Studies

A Photo of Carl SwansonCarl Swanson is a Ph.D. student in the Dept. of Film and Media Studies. He earned a B.L.S. with concentrations in English and Philosophy from the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 2010 and an M.A. in English from Saint Louis University in 2013. 

 


UNIV 101-University Seminar

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for FMS 100 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Communication and Leadership learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


Howard Graham, First-Year Experience

Photo of Howard GrahamSports have always been part of Howard Graham’s identity. At different points in his life he’s been a player, a coach, an academic counselor for KU athletes, and (of course) a fan. Growing up in Cooperstown, New York and living in Lawrence for 12 years—the national homes of baseball and basketball, respectively—have shaped how he sees and thinks about sports. Over the years, Howard’s passion for sports has led him to pursue its study from a variety of disciplines, as well as more recently to name his son after his bowling ball.

 

 

 


Jess Hall, First-Year Experience

An Image of Jess Hall

Jessica Hall's position as a Student Systems Coordinator oversees information and communication systems for programs housed in the Office of First-Year Experience. Jessica utilizes our technology systems so that they can be leveraged to enhance the student experience.

Jessica received her Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Social Statistics with minors in Education and Women and Gender Studies in May 2015 from Michigan State University. Jessica is working towards obtaining a Master's of Public Administration at the University of Kansas. In her undergraduate career, Jessica worked as a Resident Assistant with Residence Education and Housing Services and was the vice president of Amnesty International.

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Identity and Experience: Global Perspectives, Gender, Africa & the African Diaspora

Psychology (PSYC) 104 - General Psychology

Fulfills Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 credit hours:

A basic introduction to the science of psychology.

A “global perspective” is when someone can think about a situation as it relates to the rest of the world. In Global Perspectives: Gender, Africa, & the African Diaspora, students will be introduced to the principles, theories, and methodology of psychology, while exploring the concept of “feminism” and “gender identity” in relation to Francophone (French-speaking) West African and Caribbean cultures.


Instructor TBD.


African & African-American Studies (AAAS) 177 - Women with Open Eyes: Feminism, Gender, Culture & Identity in Africa and the African Diaspora

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 credit hours

What does “being a woman” mean? Do you think ‘being a woman’ is perceived the same way across different cultures? How much of gender identity is universal and how much is it tied to socialization and cultural norms? To patriarchy? To education? To the economy? To religion? What does the term “gender” mean? Is it the same as feminism? What is feminism? What is womanism? In Feminism is for Everybody: Passionate Politics, author bell hooks describes feminism as “a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression.” This course will introduce students to the concept of feminism and gender identity in Francophone (French-speaking) West African and Caribbean cultures. Among the various questions that this seminar will address are: How is feminism and gender identity connected to themes such as patriarchy, sexism, violence and stereotypes? How are gender expectations and stereotypes formed and how do they impact development and human rights?  What role does class and education play in empowering women? Through readings and films such as  Krik? Krak! by Edwidge Danticat, So Long a Letter by Mariama Bâ and Faat Kiné by Sembène Ousmane we will explore these various questions.


Cecile Accilien, African & African American Studies

A Photo of Cecile AcilienCécile Accilien was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti and grew up in Newark, New Jersey. She is fluent in French and Haitian Creole and has conversational ability in Spanish. She has lived in Burkina Faso (West Africa), France, Senegal and Belgium. She is passionate about traveling and discovering new cultures. Her areas of interest include Literary and Cultural Studies, Women and Gender Studies and Film Studies.

 

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Identity & Experience: Global Perspectives, WWI

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies (WGSS) 101 - Introduction to Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies

Fulfills Goal 4 Outcome 1 (AE41), Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 credit hours

This course examines the extensive role of gender in human life and examines the ways that gender structures power relations among individuals and within economic, political, educational and other social structures, with special attention paid to women's issues and movements in the United States and globally. Through readings drawn from the fields of women's studies, gender studies, and sexuality studies, this course examines and explores alternatives to traditional and/or normative constructions of gender and sexuality, and also considers other markers of difference, such as disability, race, class, and religion, which intersect with gender identity and sexual identity.

A “global perspective” is when someone can think about a situation as it relates to the rest of the world. In the courses that comprise Identity and Experience: Global Perspectives, WWI, HUM/EURS 177 and WGSS 101, students will be introduced to the interdisciplinary study of women, gender, and sexuality, while exploring how World War I continues to shape our lives up to the present day.


Katie Batza, Women,Gender, and Sexuality Studies

A Photo of Katie BatzaKatie Batza earned her doctorate in United States History from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2011 along with a graduate concentration in Work, Race, Gender, and the Urban World and a graduate certificate in Gender and Women's Studies. Her research explores the intersection of sexuality, health, and politics in the late-20th century United States. Her book, "Before AIDS" was published at the University of Pennsylvania Press in February 2018 and explores gay health activism in the period before AIDS. She employs a wide array of research methods in her work, including oral history. She also has published an article in the Journal of Women’s History that examines the history of lesbians and the fertility industry. She has played an active role in the National Park Service’s LGBTQ initiative, contributing a chapter to the National Park Services LGBTQ theme study and co-founding a non-profit, Rainbow Heritage Network, that aids in identifying, preserving, and interpreting historic sites of particular meaning to the LGBTQ communities. She has also begun a second book project that explores the experiences of the early AIDS crisis in the Heartland. She taught at Macalester College in Minnesota and Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania before joining the KU faculty.


Humanities/European Studies (HUM/EURS) 177 - How World War I Changed the World

Fulfills Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), 3 credit hours

World War I, which began 100 years ago, is largely responsible for shaping the way we understand ourselves and creating the world we inhabit. The Great War accelerated changes in technology, transportation, art, fashion, food, science, religion, gender and social relations, leisure, and other aspects of everyday life in Europe and the United States. From Downtown Abbey (PBS) to War Horse (Spielberg), even today, we find it necessary to make sense of this catastrophic event in modern history. This course will try to do just that.


Dale Urie, Humanities

Senior Lecturer Dale UrieDale Urie grew up in Florida, part of a family that took vacations to Egypt, Jordan, Israel and many parts of Europe. A family vacation as a teenager launched her interest in understanding the connections between the past and present, between peoples of one region and another and between religions. As a modern European historian she has taught classes on the development of civilizations and on both World War I and World War II. Most recently she won a Fulbright to continue examining the role that Muslim immigrants in Europe are playing in redefining what it meant to be European and what it means to be Muslim in traditionally non-Muslim countries. She is currently in Florence, Italy with a group of KU students directing a semester-long study abroad program for the Humanities and Western Civilization program. The semester ends in Paris, France where she hopes to do some research that will be included in this course on World War I.

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Identity and Experience: Social Health and Communities

Sociology (SOC) 104 - Elements of Sociology

Fulfills Goal 4 Outcome 1 (AE41), Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11), Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S)

The study of social life, including how human groups are organized, how they change, and how they influence individuals. Consideration is given to a variety of human organizations and social institutions and how these groups and institutions both determine, and are determined by, human beings.

In Identity and Experience: Social Health and Communities students study human organizations, institutions, and relationships.  The combination of courses, Sociology 104 and UNIV 101, allows students to consider these topics both globally and locally.  This learning community helps students develop an understanding of and appreciation for the causes and consequences of human behavior and offers opportunities to apply this learning to the transition to college and the exploration of KU’s communities and campus.  The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of sociology and communities, while introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Sociology 104, but in all of their courses.  


Lisa-Marie Wright, Sociology


Lisa-Marie Wright - more information coming soon.

 

 

 

 


UNIV 101 – University Seminar

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to making connections as part of the Identity & Experience: Social Connections and Communities learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


Jasmine Smith, Undergraduate Advising Center 

A Photo of Jasmine Smith

Jasmine Smith is an academic advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Center. She was a first-generation college student and graduated from the University of Lynchburg where she earned her B.A. in English and Political Science and M.Ed. in Educational Leadership. During her undergrad she studied abroad to over 10 different countries, volunteered in the community with her sorority, was an active member in various student organizations, and went on multiple backpacking and camping trips in the Blue Ridge Mountains. When not in the office you can find her listening to true crime podcasts, traveling, watching movies, outdoor adventuring, reading, nerding out, eating good food, or playing with her corgi, Morty!

 

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Communicating Science: The Natural World

Biology (BIO) 100-Principles of Biology/Biology 102 

Goal 3 Natural Sciences (GE3N), 3 Credit Hours, 1 credit: Intended for non-science majors

The basic concepts of biology at the cellular, organismal, and population levels of organization and their applications to humans and modern society. An honors section, BIOL 101, is offered for students with superior academic records. BIOL 100 and BIOL 102 (or BIOL 101 and BIOL 103, honors) satisfy the College natural science with laboratory requirement. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 102 is recommended.

Cells, communities, and ecosystems! Oh, my! In Communicating Science: Natural World, students will develop a strong foundation for success at KU and beyond, while learning how to sort out valid scientific information from all the information available and use that information to inform decisions, a skill important to all of us as global citizens. In Biology 100 students will learn the basic concepts of biology at the cellular, organismal, and population levels of organization and their applications to humans and modern society. The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of biology, while introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Biology 100, but in all of their courses.  


Tara Marriage & Kristina Holder

Bios coming soon.


UNIV 101-University Seminar

Samantha Simmons, KU Libraries

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for Biol. 100 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Communication and Leadership learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.

Samantha Simmons more information coming soon.  


Natalie Mahan, KU Libraries

Natalie Mahan is an undergraduate learning specialist at KU Libraries. Originally from Oregon, she graduated from Portland State University where she mainly studied philosophy, and women, gender and sexualities. After graduating, she spent a year in South Korea teaching English as a foreign language. Now a Kansas transplant, Natalie is approaching her final semester in library school and aspires to be an academic librarian. She is passionate about teaching people how to find and evaluate information. In her free time, Natalie enjoys reading, baking, and playing video games.

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Communicating Science: Health & Behavior

Applied Behavioral Science (ABSC) 100-Introduction to Applied Behavioral Science

Goal 1 Outcome 1 (GE11) , Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 Credit Hours:

An introduction to the principles of behavioral science and their application to problems facing contemporary societies (e.g., autism, public health, education, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse). Students will learn how behavioral scientists analyze human behavior and how these analyses are used to inform interventions. Students will also learn about careers in the behavioral sciences and how to pursue them. Course may be offered in lecture or online format.

The Communicating Science: Health & Behavior learning community introduces students to the principles of behavioral science and their application to problems facing contemporary societies. Topics in Applied Behavioral Science (ABSC) 100 include autism, public health, education, juvenile delinquency, and substance abuse.  The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of behavioral science, while introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in ABSC 100, but in all of their courses. 


Derek Reed, Department of Applied Behavioral Science

An Image of Derek ReedDerek Reed earned his doctorate in School Psychology from Syracuse University, and now serves as Director of the KU Applied Behavioral Economics Laboratory and Scientist in the Cofrin Logan Center for Addiction Research and Treatment. His research focuses on how to integrate ideas from economics to optimize human behavior, especially in the treatment of substance use disorders (specifically nicotine/tobacco, alcohol, cannabis) and risky health decisions (unsafe sexual practices, UV tanning, texting and driving). He is also interested in applying principles of behavior to maximizing student achievement in his courses and using the science of learning to improve his teaching and course design.


UNIV 101-University Seminar

2 credit hours

UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for ABSC 100 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Communication and Leadership learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


A Professional Photo of Josh JonesJosh Jones, Institutional Opportunity & Access

Joshua Jones is currently the Director and Title IX Coordinator for the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access at the University of Kansas. In his role he oversees the investigation of complaints of discrimination and harassment at the University made by students, faculty, and staff. Joshua also engages with various campus communities to educate the Jayhawk community on sexual assault, sexual harassment, discrimination, unconscious bias, microaggressions, consent, bystander intervention, and mandatory reporter obligations. In his role he is also responsible for coordinating the University's Annual Security Report and Fire Safety Report. Joshua received his Ed.S in Higher Education and Student Affairs from the University of Iowa, his Juris Doctorate from Ohio Northern University, and is currently a doctoral student working towards his Ed.D in Higher Education Administration here at the University of Kansas. 

 

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Communicating Science: Psychology

Psychology (PSYC) 104-General Psychology

Goal 3 Social Sciences (GE3S), 3 Credit Hours

A basic introduction to the science of psychology.

The mission of the Department of Psychology at the University of Kansas is to further the understanding of the mind, the brain, and human behavior through classes and research. In the Communicating Science: Psychology learning community, students are introduced to the basic and foundational concepts of the science of psychology through the Psychology 104 course. The linked section of UNIV 101 provides students with experiences that enhance their understanding of psychology, while introducing skills that will help them be successful not only in Psychology 104, but in all of their courses. 


Instructor TBD.


UNIV 101-University Seminar

2 credit hour

UNIV 101, 2 credit hours: UNIV 101 helps students to make a smooth transition to KU and provides an important foundation to their academic studies. This two-credit hour seminar is small, enrolling about 19 students. In addition to providing a community for Psyc. 104 students, by being a part of the Building a Better Future World: Communication and Leadership learning community, you will know campus better, will more fully understand your individual and team strengths, will practice and develop critical thinking skills, will learn about information literacy and research, and will gain memorable experiences.


Christine Cain

A Photo of Christine CainChristine Cain joined the Madison and Lila Self Graduate Fellowship as the Recruitment Coordinator in June of 2018. She is responsible for recruiting qualified applicants to attend KU, maintaining the fellowship’s online and social media presence, communicating with eligible academic departments, and managing the fellow selection process. She also administrates the Self Graduating Senior Fellowship.

Christine is originally from Sheldon, IA. She received her bachelor’s degree in English, creative writing, with a business administration minor from Creighton University in Omaha, NE. Her master’s degree is in Higher and Postsecondary Education from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York, NY. Her master’s specialization is in the social/cultural and civic analysis of higher education. Christine has previously lived and worked in Iowa, Nebraska, New York, Texas, and Kansas. She loves to travel, and her favorite thing to do since coming to Kansas has been exploring the diversely delicious food scene that Lawrence has to offer!

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